sautéed bean and pea salad

· lentils, tarragon, egg, mustard ·

July 22, 2015 9 Comments

Sauteed Beans and Peas w/ Tarragon Mustard Dressing | fromthelandweliveon.com

It’s a crazy jungle out there this month! In the best possible way.

If you’re new here, I’m doing quick monthly garden updates as I adventure through my first summer of gardening. I posted earlier updates in March, May, and June.

July Garden // fromthelandweliveon.comIn Toronto (zone 5/6-ish), July is the month of the first tomato, the 1000th zucchini, and an ongoing supply of green beans and peas. I’ll do a longer update next month when I get to show off the tomatoes, today… just a few quick words on this month’s stars: beans and peas.

I saved some Rancho Gordo beans a few years back, for the day that I’d have somewhere to plant them, and bought a few more varieties just in case those didn’t germinate. I ended up losing track of which beans were which, but the dragon tongues identified themselves. The beans are striking! Pale yellow pods with streaks of purple taste even better than they look. Juicy! Juicy was previously strictly reserved for the very best of tomatoes and ripe peaches, but here I am telling everyone about these juicy beans that I’m growing. I hear they make some pretty great shelling beans too!

Dragon's Tongue Beans // fromthelandweliveon.comThe peas were a little less dramatic, but just as delicious, super cute, and on a mission to take over the world. That trellis that I bragged about last month ended up toppling over in a storm so I had to tie the pea mess to the fence. There were so many broken stems but they did alright. Sprang right back up!

peas // fromthelandweliveon.comSo how do you cook them beans and peas? You don’t have to. We ate most of the peas raw, and those dragon tongues were pretty good snapped right off the bush. Once we had our raw fix, my mom enjoyed hers simply blanched in well-salted water and I had mine sautéed in garlic and butter, ever-so-lightly, and served with lentils, egg, and a mustard and tarragon dressing. The dragon tongues lose their purple streaks when cooked, but you can preserve some of the colour if you’re gentle. Remember they’re totally good to eat raw, I just went for a “warm salad” vibe, not a thoroughly cooked bean.

Sauteed Beans and Peas w/ Tarragon Mustard Dressing | fromthelandweliveon.com

Sautéed Beans and Peas // fromthelandweliveon.com

Sautéed Bean and Pea Salad

Ingredients

    Mustard Tarragon Dressing
  • 1 Tbsp. grainy mustard
  • 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped tarragon (sub. dill if you don't have tarragon or are not a fan)
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. honey
  • Sauteed Beans
  • 2 Tbsp. butter
  • 2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 lb mixed young snap beans, snow peas, sugar snap peas, or shelling peas, trimmed (see note for prep tips)
  • Other
  • 2 cups cooked and seasoned puy lentils (sub. green or black lentils or whole grains)
  • 1 hard boiled egg
  • chopped tarragon, dill, and/or dill flowers
  • salt and pepper

Instructions

  1. Whisk all of the dressing ingredients together and set aside.
  2. In a large sauté pan or wok, melt the butter, then add chopped garlic and sautee for a minute, until fragrant.
  3. Add the beans and sauté, tossing, for a few minutes, just until they're warm and are just starting to soften.
  4. Serve on a bed of seasoned lentils (I used just salt and bay leaf in the cooking water), and grate the egg on top. Garnish with more tarragon, dill, and/or dill flowers. Drizzle with the the dressing and toss just before serving. Taste and adjust with salt and pepper.

Notes

If using string beans, make sure to remove the strings before cooking. Many varieties (like the dragon tongue), don't have a string and can just be trimmed at the tip and ready to go. If using shelling peas, remove the peas from the pod and toss them in to the sauté pan at the end, just to coat in butter.

Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by Yummly Rich Recipes
http://fromthelandweliveon.com/july-garden-update-beans-and-peas/

 

9 Comments

  1. Reply

    Brianne

    July 22, 2015

    Those beans are beautiful! We’ve learned now that our yard is far too shady in the summer to let anything grow. We might get some tomatoes, but the radishes, kale, zucchini, carrots, and beets that we planted aren’t doing too well. It’s such a bummer, especially since we spent so much time prepping soil and building raised beds this spring! I’d like to try converting our raised beds into cold frames and growing winter greens. When the leaves fall, we get so much light! I’m not giving up on gardening at this house just yet! I’m so happy to see your first year garden doing so well. I’m looking forward to the next update…especially if it involves tomatoes!!

    • Reply

      Sofia

      July 22, 2015

      The cold frames sound like a great idea! Both for early spring and fall. You should be able to get some greens and radishes since they grow so fast. Hope that works out better than the summer garden!

  2. Reply

    janet @ the taste space

    July 22, 2015

    Love it! I love all the glorious greens in your backyard and especially the beans. Technically I knew Rancho Gordo’s beans could be planted but I assumed they wouldn’t grow up here…. now I really want to experiment (next year obviously). I have Tongues of Fire beans but not Dragon Tongues… and a quest for new beans could never be a bad thing. ;)

    • Reply

      Sofia

      July 22, 2015

      Yeah! There are so many interesting varieties. I used to think that beans were beans but the Rancho Gordos really motivated me to experiment. Looking forward to the dried bean harvest in the fall to see what comes of that. So far the dragon tongues were the only ones that were worth growing for the pods.

  3. Reply

    Ksenia @ At the Immigrant’s Table

    July 22, 2015

    Your garden is absolutely beautiful – and THOSE BEANS!! Did you just plant rancho gordo dried beans straight in the ground, and that’s what came out?? I’ll have to try that one day!
    I could definitely see myself making that salad next time I come back from the market with a large haul of beans. I’m never sure what to do with them beyond a simple frying with olive oil and garlic, and this seems like the perfect solution.

    • Reply

      Sofia

      July 22, 2015

      Thanks, Ksenia! I planted Good Mother Stallard and Yellow Eye Beans from my Rancho Gordo stash, but lost track of them since all the green ones look alike at this point. I’ll have to wait until fall to see if they were actually successful. The pictured beans were from here: http://www.rareseeds.com/dragon-tongue-bush-bean/.

  4. Reply

    Sophie|A Kitchen In Uganda

    October 9, 2015

    Hi Sofia, I came across your blog from Sophie’s(Local is lovely) and I am staying! These beans look good and the fact that they are fresh from the garden makes them even more appealing! I love the photography too. Nice to meet you.

    • Reply

      Sofia

      October 9, 2015

      Hi Sophie! Wow so many name twins (almost)! I just replied to a comment from another Sophie. Thanks so much for reading, and for the kind words :)

LEAVE A COMMENT